Heart Rate and its effect on our overall Health


Calculate what your heart rate tell about your overall health by telling us your resting heart rate. Normal resting heart rate of people vary from 60 to 100 beats/minute, but if it remains below 60 (known as bradycardia) or above 100 (known as tachycardia) then it is a medical condition.

Tell us your age, gender and resting heart rate, we will tell you if it is OK or not.

How to know your RHR (Resting heart rate) ?
To know your resting heart rate you should lie down comfortably on your back for a few minutes and take long breathes and calm down your mind. If you can't do it right now, then you must know that heart beats slightly faster while sitting, so you may enter some lesser value. Best way to measure your pulse is by putting your index finger on the wrist area of opposite hand, just below the thumb, and then count it for 1 minute. If you have got a wristband / health band then it can also tell your pulse rate.

Gender:
Age :
Resting Heart Rate :

Heart rate (also known as pulse rate) is something which is strongly connected to our overall health. Your heart rate changes several times in a day depending on your body positions such as resting (lying), walking, sitting, running or during workout. Resting heart rate is generally used to estimate your overall health. Heart rate of a health adult can change suddenly while changing body positions, from resting to standing or from standing to running. But unhealthy and older adults with unhealthy cardiovascular health feel uncomfortable in changing positions suddenly, thus advised by doctors to change positions slowly to keep themselves safe from sudden heart rate change.

How to lower your Resting Heart Rate (RHR) ?

But why do heart rate change while changing positions? 
The answer to this question is dependent on various factors, which are
  • Effect of gravitation on blood flow.
  • Effect of physical activity on blood / oxygen demand by body parts.
  • Posture of thigh
When we keep lying for a few minutes the blood flows back to heart without much effort, compared to standing, where blood flows from legs to heart against the gravitational pull. To create this extra push and pull our heart beats at a higher rate.
Physical activity also creates demand for more oxygen and energy from muscles and cells helping in the activity. That demand is fulfilled through blood supply by increasing heart rate. Blood carries oxygen and nutrients/energy to organs in need. This reason also explains the increased breathing during physical activity.
Posture of our thigh also affects our heart beat. In sitting posture, our thigh is usually parallel to the ground, while in standing posture it is vertical to ground. Thighs parallel to ground decrease the heart beat. Due to this reason, our resting heart rate can increase if we bend our knees while lying on back.
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